Where are the best locations for England's baby booming buyers?

Where are the best locations for England's baby booming buyers?
The birth of a child is always a big event and often influences where we buy and with raising a child becoming increasingly expensive, saving on the price of a property can make all the difference

Ahead of Valentine’s Day, the latest research by online estate agent, eMoov.co.uk, takes a look at the most popular areas of England for homebuyers looking to make a love nest, based on the number of births in each county and the affordability of property in the area.

eMoov looked at the total number of births across each county to find the areas with the highest number, before highlighting the top 10 with an average house price below the English average of £234,278.

The West Midlands came out on top, with 19,005 registered births in a calendar year, it is the second highest behind just London, but with an average house price nearly £258,000 cheaper than the capital (£163,162). With the birth of children often spurring a move to a larger property, the West Midlands lower average house price is no doubt what makes it a popular option for those starting or extending a family.

Greater Manchester would seem the next best option, with an average house price of just £152,747, there was 18,446 births recorded there, the third highest across the nation.

West Yorkshire (14,595), Merseyside (10,33) and South Yorkshire (9,394) are home to the next highest number of births across England and all offer an average house price between £131,000 and £146,828.

Lancashire (7,048), Tyne and Wear (6,995) and Cheshire (5,846) all saw more than 5,000 new additions to the county and in addition, buyers in Lancashire and Tyne and Wear can get on the ladder for less than £137,000, with the average house price in Cheshire also more affordable at £176,49.

Norfolk and Nottinghamshire complete the top 10 with an average house price of £212,509 and 161,508 respectively, with both seeing the number of births in a year fall just below 5,000.


On top of these 10, there are an additional 15 counties where the average house price is still lower than the national average, making them more realistic for potential buyers starting a family.

The City of London, where the average house price is 790,439, just 16 births were registered, proving that perhaps an expensive house price is the best deterrent to starting a family.

Russell Quirk, founder and CEO of eMoov.co.uk, had this to say: “The birth of a child is always a big event and often influences where we buy and with raising a child becoming increasingly expensive, saving on the price of a property can make all the difference.

So, it is no surprise that 70% of the top ten counties for the highest birth rates are home to a lower average house price, as expecting parents look to make their finances stretch as far as they can.

Of course, it isn’t always like for like as London proves with the highest birth rate in England, but it highlights where is the best places to consider for potential parents and buyers.”

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Tony Gimple
Tony Gimple 09 Dec 2017

Linking professionalism to limited company borrowing is a flawed concept. Despite S24 etc., limited companies are the most tax inefficient way of running a property business and leave borrowers seriously...

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Evelyn Attwood
Evelyn Attwood 01 Dec 2017

It's normal. If you plan to buy a house in one of the most beautiful spots in the country you should pay a high price.

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Evelyn Attwood
Evelyn Attwood 01 Dec 2017

I think that the situation will be the same at December.

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Scott Garnet
Scott Garnet 06 Nov 2017

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richardrawlings
richardrawlings 01 Nov 2017

What has not been mentioned here is the effect of not only higher interest payments, but also that these payments are less likely to be offsettable as a business cost due to the scaling back of mortgage...

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Kelvin Lloyd
Kelvin Lloyd 09 Oct 2017

IT is up, to the Planners. If they will only give permission for bungalows on certain (suitable) sites, they will be built.

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maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

It's just the beginning of the shocking rise.

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maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

I have recently read that the bungalows can provide social housing for elderly residents in London.

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zoe glover
zoe glover 05 Oct 2017

Update! Worst company I have ever dealt with. Undervalued a Cambridge property by over 100k, wont take on any evidence of valuation including a RICS valuation done 3 years ago for the very same value...

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Paul Edwards
Paul Edwards 27 Sep 2017

Its nonsense articles such as this that make it harder to get clients to realise just how difficult the market is out there. When you see Rightmove and there are more 'price reduced' then 'new' most days...

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Tom Allen
Tom Allen 20 Sep 2017

Absolutely agree with you!

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RyanGeo
RyanGeo 18 Sep 2017

A sharp correction would be a less dramatic expression to use. That is already underway in certain sectors in Reading where I practice as Chartered Surveyor

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