Landlords

What is the top priority for tenants in 2016?

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6th January 2016
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A new study, conducted by PropertyLetByUs.com, has found that as winter temperatures drop and rainfall remains higher than average in many parts of the UK, it's not just home owners that are concerned about the cost of keeping warm and dry.

According to the findings, cost-effective central heating is a must for a fifth of tenants.

Many tenants said they were concerned about keeping their homes warm and free of damp and condensation. Over 80% cited double glazing as the top priority for their next rental home in 2016.

UK homes are some of the most expensive to heat in Europe, mainly down to poor maintenance and insulation, according to figures from the EU. It is estimated that over 10m British families live in a home with a leaking roof, damp walls or rotting windows.  Damp, condensation and mould is a big problem in many rental properties as a result of older, single glazed homes.

Jane Morris, Managing Director of PropertyLetByUs.com comments: “It is estimated that around one million tenants are paying as much as £1,000 a year more for heating than the average annual bill of £1,265.  These excessive costs are mainly down to poorly insulated homes, many of which are thought to be the oldest and leakiest rental properties in Europe."

Jane continued: "Clearly, double-glazed properties are highly sought after by tenants and landlords that offer this will be in large demand.  However, landlords that are offering draughty, damp accommodation should not delay in improving their properties, as new legislation will see landlords banned from renting out England and Wales’ draughtiest homes from 2018, in a bid to cut energy bills and carbon emissions.

Landlords with properties rated F and G will be unable to let them out from 1 April 2018. The regulations also mean that from 1 April 2016, tenants living in F and G rated homes will be able to request improvements, such as more insulation. The landlord will then be legally bound to bring the property up to an E rating. As a matter of urgency, landlords that are currently renting out F and G rated properties should be reviewing the improvements that can be made together with researching costs and available help, through the Government’s Green Deal.”

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