Landlords beware: Sub-letting on the rise

Landlords beware: Sub-letting on the rise

New research by landlord insurance provider Direct Line for Business reveals that one in six (17%) tenants in the UK admits to having rented out part or all of their property to someone who isn't on the lease agreement.

A quarter of tenants who sub-let their property didn't check the terms of their lease to see if it was permitted, while 34% had not informed their landlord of the decision.

Of the sub-letters who did not inform their landlord, 23% got found out in the end anyway.  The consequences when landlords catch tenants sub-letting can be severe. In 11% of cases the tenants named on the lease were evicted with 6% losing their deposit in the process. Other repercussions include landlords increasing rental charges (22%), issuing a fine (14%) or issuing a formal warning (8%).

In spite of this, Direct Line for Business's research reveals that 2016 could see an increase in the number of people sub-letting their properties. One in six renters (15%) claim they are thinking about sub-letting part or all of their rented property by advertising on property letting websites such as Airbnb.

Nick Breton, Head of Direct Line for Business said: “The average monthly rent across  the UK currently stands at £7392. This means on average, approximately a third of people's income goes towards accommodation. With the market having seen a five per cent increase in average rents in the last year, it seems that a larger number of renters are tempted to offset this expense by sub-letting their properties.”


Over the last two years, Landlord Action have seen an 18% increase in the number of instructions from from landlords with sub-letting cases.

Paul Shamplina, Founder of Landlord Action commented, “Sub-letting is fast becoming one of the leading grounds for eviction, alongside rent arrears and Section 21 for possession only. This has been fuelled by sky high rents preventing some tenants from being able to afford even single-unit accommodation, forcing many to resort to bedsits or shared accommodation.

Organised sub-letting scams are also becoming more prevalent, where tenants, or sometimes even fake tenants, advertise properties and rooms on holiday/accommodation websites in order to cream a profit without the landlords' consent.”

When looking at who the properties are sub-let to, friends or recommendations (28%) are the two most common types of sub-lets. Family members account for just over a fifth (21%), while 19% of renters have sub-let to strangers responding to an advert.

Sub-letting is most common in the North West and West Midlands, where more than a quarter (27%) of private tenants say that have sub-let their properties. London (23%) is third, while renters in the South East (9%) and Northern Ireland (7%) are least likely to sub-let their properties.

Nick Breton continued: “There could be some serious consequences for tenants who sub-let, but landlords need to be aware that in these circumstances there could also be insurance implications. Sub-letting is not covered under most insurance policies, so it's really important that landlords make their tenants fully aware of the restrictions on the lease and maintain that communication that can help prevent any future breaches”.

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Latest Comments

Kelvin Lloyd
Kelvin Lloyd 09 Oct 2017

IT is up, to the Planners. If they will only give permission for bungalows on certain (suitable) sites, they will be built.

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maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

It's just the beginning of the shocking rise.

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maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

I have recently read that the bungalows can provide social housing for elderly residents in London.

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zoe glover
zoe glover 05 Oct 2017

Update! Worst company I have ever dealt with. Undervalued a Cambridge property by over 100k, wont take on any evidence of valuation including a RICS valuation done 3 years ago for the very same value...

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Paul Edwards
Paul Edwards 27 Sep 2017

Its nonsense articles such as this that make it harder to get clients to realise just how difficult the market is out there. When you see Rightmove and there are more 'price reduced' then 'new' most days...

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Tom Allen
Tom Allen 20 Sep 2017

Absolutely agree with you!

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RyanGeo
RyanGeo 18 Sep 2017

A sharp correction would be a less dramatic expression to use. That is already underway in certain sectors in Reading where I practice as Chartered Surveyor

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sean benton
sean benton 01 Sep 2017

Identity theft is a thread for any profession. So,people should stay alarmed. I once take help from a letting agent and came to know that letting agents are taking every precaution to prevent fraudulent...

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Mark N.
Mark N. 30 Aug 2017

We have seen a surge in instructions over August and that should continue into September too.

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Chris
Chris 30 Aug 2017

Unfortunately, all the legislation bears its force on Landlords and ignores, naively, the effect of Rogue Tenants on the ability of landlords to keep houses in repair and offer properties for rent at reasonable...

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Christian Donovan
Christian Donovan 18 Aug 2017

The write-down on house values, combined with the fall in the GBP saddled the fund?s property portfolio with a 1.4% loss in the second quarter. The shocking amount of $240 million.

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Samantha Goodman
Samantha Goodman 11 Aug 2017

Interesting point of view.

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