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45% of landlords say they will raise rents next year

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45% of landlords say they will raise rents next year

A new survey carried out by flatshare site, SpareRoom.co.uk, has found that 45% of BTL landlords are planning to raise their rents in 2016, and almost one in five (18%) are planning inflation-busting increases of more than 3%.

The most common reason landlords cite (38%) for raising rents is the additional costs incurred by new government legislation2, meaning future cuts to mortgage interest and wear and tear tax relief, stamp duty changes and costs of the 2016 Right to Rent roll out will be felt by tenants as well as landlords.

Other reasons for rent increases include rents rising locally (23%), expensive property repairs and maintenance (6%) and higher mortgage repayments (4%).

The table below shows what landlords plan to do with rents next year:

Landlords: What do you plan to do with rents in 2016?

Response (%)

Raise by more than 3%

18%

Raise by less than 3%

27%

Keep the same

52%

Lower by less than 3%

1%

Lower by more than 3%

2%


The reality is that average room rents may rise far higher than 3%, based on rental increases over the past year, and given the changes ahead for landlords. The average UK rent for a double room in shared accommodation rose by 8.6% in the past year to £593 per month – up from £546 the previous year – according to SpareRoom’s rental data. In London, the average room rent has increased annually by 6.3% to £721 per month, up from £678 a year ago4.

Given that 49% of landlords increased their rents in 2015 and a further 20% increased them within the past two years3, this will be yet another blow for renters who are already stretched when it comes to affordability. Tenants will be hoping their landlord is one of the 55% who don’t plan to increase their rents next year or, if they’re lucky, one of the 3% reducing them.

Matt Hutchinson, director of SpareRoom.co.uk, comments: “The roll out of Right to Rent legislation, removal of mortgage interest tax relief and changes to the wear and tear tax break from 2017, on top of stamp duty changes coming in 2019, means buy to let looks like far more of a risk than it did at the start of the year.

The worry is that tenants will bear the brunt of these changes. And if renters end up being the ones to shoulder the burden of legislative change, something has gone very very wrong. The private rental sector is already under immense pressure.”

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Latest Comments

CommercialTrust
CommercialTrust 20 May 2016

With the bulk of the market controlled by large developers, profit rather than necessity determine the pace at which homes are built. There are hundreds of thousands of plots that have planning permission...

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Johna
Johna 20 May 2016

"Easier said than done" is what I would say. Of course, it would be more than great to have more in quality and affordability, but I do not trust talk anymore.. What is said is not what is happening.

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Johna
Johna 20 May 2016

in my humble opinion being fair like THE most important! I myself have had bad experience with unfair landlords... not to mention that I know how to do a proper end of tenancy cleaning since I am a fantastic...

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richardrawlings
richardrawlings 18 May 2016

NB - even if we doubled our commission levels in the UK, we'd still be by far the cheapest agents in the entire world.

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Agent_PeeBee
Agent_PeeBee 18 May 2016

Clueless. Someone needs to take these people's computers away from them so they can do no more harm than they already have.

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richardrawlings
richardrawlings 18 May 2016

Nonsense! The cost of selling a house nowadays has little bearing on the fees charged. Don't believe your own spin on this. Fees have spiralled down to pathetic levels in areas where weak agents have allowed...

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Simon Oliver
Simon Oliver 16 May 2016

The best solution is to buy a property that has built-in income generating potential: a nice house with a couple of gites in the grounds is a good start. In France, the rune of thumb is that one 2-bedroomed...

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WPD
WPD 12 May 2016

I suggest the answer is to have the notary system being one legal person who represents both parties. Having experienced it a couple of times in France it was a dream compared to our dysfunctional system....

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warren
warren 03 May 2016

It's enough to make me weep into my Pimm's :(

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james anderson
james anderson 03 May 2016

The sad demise of the croquet lawn...

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CommercialTrust
CommercialTrust 11 Apr 2016

".. the stricter lending criteria will reduce the amount of buy-to-let lending by 10% to 20% in three years’ time." The PRA was actually referring to cumulative approvals here. What they believe is that...

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Paul Watson
Paul Watson 07 Apr 2016

Interesting research. Confirms the myth that supply and demand of housing stock affects house prices. Unless you live in Central London or a National Park, it's credit availability that drives house price...

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