Household

Could DIY be good for your well-being?

According to a new study, 75% of millennials believe DIY has a positive effect on their well-being, despite being a generation of convenience.

Warren Lewis
|
9th November 2017
DIY 5

According to a new study, 75% of millennials believe DIY has a positive effect on their well-being, despite being a generation of convenience.

Exploring the way Brits view DIY, the study by 247 Blinds, found that 67% of 16-25 year-old’s commonly known as Gen Z, also believe DIY makes them happy, while a third (33%) of over 55’s use DIY as a way of keeping active.  
 
As far as what drives Brits to do DIY around their homes, the research revealed different generational motives. For half (50%) of millennials and Gen Z (52%), it’s all about adding personal touches to the home, while both 35-44 (48%) and 45-54 year olds (51%), break out the tools to save themselves some cash.
 
The study also looks at how DIY makes women feel in comparison to men. Over one in ten (11%) men say DIY makes them miserable. In fact, two in five (40%) only DIY to save money, while 14% simply don’t trust anyone else to do the job.

Men typically spend on average 7-10 hours per month on DIY tasks - in comparison to women who are likely to spend 0-2 hours monthly.
With regards to their female counterparts however, one in five (20%) say DIY makes them feel happy, while three quarters (75%) feel fulfilled after completing DIY tasks around the home. Unlike men who focus on savings, over half (56%) of women use DIY to add personal touches to their home while nearly a third (31%) enjoy learning new skills.
 
Jason Peterkin, Director of 247 Blinds, comments: “With the increase of DIY in the home, we wanted to reveal how Brits feel it impacts their well-being and happiness. It’s interesting to see millennials see it as a positive activity, despite being raised in a generation of technology and convenience.

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