FCA orders rent to own provider to redress 59,000 customers

FCA orders rent to own provider to redress 59,000 customers

Dunraven Finance Ltd, trading under the name Buy as You View (BAYV), has agreed to pay out compensation of £939,000 after the FCA identified concerns of historic unfair treatment to its customers.

The FCA identified concerns with BAYV’s policies and procedures across a number of areas, such as fees which were not clearly set out to customers, the fair treatment of customers in arrears, and the manner in which BAYV uses payment meters to restrict access to the customer’s TV when payments are not received on time. Concerns were also raised over the robustness of the firm’s creditworthiness assessments.

In response to this an independent Skilled Person was appointed in October 2015 to review and monitor the firm’s plans to address the concerns raised.

Jonathan Davidson, Director of Supervision – Retail and Authorisations at the FCA said: “We are pleased that BAYV is working with us to address our concerns. It is important that firms meet our standards, including carrying out proper creditworthiness assessment and making sure that those in difficulty are treated fairly. We will continue, when necessary, to take action against inappropriate behaviour.”

BAYV has agreed to pay redress. This will be through a balance write down or cash to customers who have been charged fees for returned direct debits and/or forbearance options. Those who have overpaid because of the impact of a modifying agreement not being fully explained to them may also receive redress. The redress package is as follows:


- 58,232 customers will receive redress as a result of fees applied to their accounts for unpaid direct debits. This covers direct debits charged from 2001.

- 1,610 customers will receive redress in respect of an administration fee historically charged of between £30 and £45 for a ‘Fresh Start Refinance’. Customers who incurred these fees between November 2012, when BAYV published its customer charter, and March 2014 when BAYV ceased this practice will receive redress.

- 3,877 customers who bought goods using modifying agreements between 1 April 2014 and August 2015 (when BAYV ceased using them) will be contacted by BAYV to assess whether they have suffered detriment as a result being sold additional goods by BAYV using modifying credit agreements, instead of using a new separate agreement for each item. Under a modifying agreement the customer would have paid more overall than under separate agreements, but they may not have been aware of this when the goods were sold. Customers will need to respond to the firm’s contact in order for their case to be individually assessed

Further to this, BAYV has changed the way it uses payment meters. A default notice will now be issued at least 14 days prior to restricting access to the customer’s TV.

The FCA also identified concerns about BAYV’s creditworthiness assessment specifically whether BAYV has been lending to customers affordably.

The appointed Skilled Person will monitor BAYV’s reassessment of its lending decisions from 1 April 2014 to the 22 October 2015.  Any customers identified as having been lent sums in excess of BAYV’s own lending criteria will receive redress at a later date. BAYV will contact customers impacted as they are identified. We will provide a further update on this once this exercise is completed.

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Latest Comments

AbbieP.
AbbieP. 22 Jul 2016

"While house prices in the most expensive eleven boroughs have declined values in the cheapest eleven boroughs continue to rise" - not a nice way to even out the price range. London is overrated as it

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AbbieP.
AbbieP. 21 Jul 2016

And try to profit from your decisions, I may add

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CommercialTrust
CommercialTrust 19 Jul 2016

Retirement investment has always been one of the biggest draws of buy to let. And the buy-to-let demographic is, on balance, older. (Over a third of our applicants are over 50 at the time of application.) It...

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Forrest Wheatey
Forrest Wheatey 11 Jul 2016

I find the time perfect for ever home-owner wannabe. Prices should slowly, but steadily drop, at least for the inner buyer. Making it harder for outsiders to buy properties (the whole Brexit thing means...

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property guru
property guru 11 Jul 2016

Why should Ajay even have to be looking for it. It should be public knowledge. Why is not just publish each years and to were it is and be AUDITED. Accountability.

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property guru
property guru 11 Jul 2016

Surprise suprise

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CommercialTrust
CommercialTrust 30 Jun 2016

This is great news for buyers and investors in a period of significant uncertainty. The 10-year buy-to-let fix at 3.99% in particular is excellent, a clear 100 bps ahead of the nearest competition. Though...

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Lee
Lee 30 Jun 2016

Let's see what happens to north-east property prices when Nissan announce they're leaving.

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DmitriKara
DmitriKara 29 Jun 2016

I just read another article about eviction rising and this was exactly what was on my mind, Housing has become "cat and mouse"...

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DmitriKara
DmitriKara 29 Jun 2016

I am really not surprised. I've seen one too many impudent tenants and in my humble opinion renters have one too many privileges and options to abuse heir landlord in so many ways...

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DmitriKara
DmitriKara 29 Jun 2016

There is still so much uncertainty and I will surely step back and see what's happening before I could make any decisions on my end.

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ChristinaReedUK
ChristinaReedUK 20 Jun 2016

I don't understand why it's always a war between the two sides. Either, way the landlord is probably keeping a detailed inventory and will see the changes you've made. I just don't understand why there...

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