How much did the average homeowner make per week in 2015?

How much did the average homeowner make per week in 2015?

The latest research by online estate agent, eMoov.co.uk, has highlighted how much UK homeowners made over the course of last year, through the increase in the value of their property.

On average homeowners across the UK made £27,264 in 2015, equating to £524 a week each for every full week and £16 for every working hour of the year. Around the same as the average salary in the UK.

London

With the inflated state of the property market in the capital, it’s almost a given that homeowners across the length and breadth of London have enjoyed some of the tidiest profits.  On average they bolstered their yearly income by £58,000 across the 32 boroughs, that’s £35 an hour, considerably higher than the minimum wage paid in the UK.

The London Borough of Camden saw the biggest rise, along with Westminster, with an increase of over £125,000 a year, £75 for every working hour, that’s an incredible £1.25 every working minute.

Homeowners in Islington, Kensington and Chelsea, Lambeth, Richmond and Southwark also enjoyed increases of over £70,000 for the year, between £40 and £55 for every working hour.

Barking and Dagenham saw the smallest increaseso across the capital at £27,000, however at a working rate of £16, homeowners in the borough have still picked up an additional income equivalent to the average UK salary.


Commuter Belt

The growing demand for affordable property in London’s commuter belt has seen property demand increase around the outskirts of the capital. Homeowners in the London commuter belt enjoyed an increase of £29,000 over the year, less than half that of the capital, but notable none the less. This still translates to just under £50 a week and £17 for every hour worked, a comforting figure to off-set those additional hours spent commuting each day.

Watford, Reading, Oxford, Brentwood and Aylesbury all ranked highest, as the most lucrative commuter zones for property value increase. Homeowners in these commuter spots made £60 a week thanks to the increasing value of their property, more than £20 an hour.

Outside of the South East

Outside of the London South East property bubble, the average increase drops, but homeowners still made £11,000 on average during 2015. At £7 for every working hour in the year, that’s still more than the minimum wage in the UK.

There were healthy increases for homeowners across the rest of the UK with Sefton, Solihull, Trafford, Southampton, Northampton, Bristol and Wiltshire all making between £10 and £16 an hour, whilst at work. That’s an additional £30 to £43 pocketed for every full week of 2015, simply through the increasing value of their property.

Unfortunately for homeowners in Durham, the city saw the smallest increase in property values, over the course of 2015. With an increase of just £607, it was the only location to see a return of less than £1, both weekly (97p), and for every hour its homeowners were at work (36p). Potential repercussions of the recent flooding in the area.

Founder and CEO of eMoov.co.uk, Russell Quirk, commented: “Homeownership is not only one of the biggest decisions in life but also one of, if not the most expensive asset us Brits will ever own. However getting over the hump of homeownership and the costs that come with it can certainly pay dividends in the long run, as this research shows.

London is always going to dominate in terms of property value increase, but even outside of the South East, UK homeowners across the board have enjoyed an increase in property value equivalent to a second salary.”

London

Location Name

Av House Price 2015

Av House Price 2016

Increase By Year

Increase By Full Week

Increase By Average Working Hour

Westminster

£1,258,255

£1,383,680

£125,425

£201

£75

Camden

£983,162

£1,108,489

£125,327

£201

£75

Islington

£719,152

£810,827

£91,675

£147

£55

Kensington and Chelsea

£2,106,135

£2,196,866

£90,731

£145

£54

Lambeth

£597,929

£675,758

£77,829

£125

£46

Richmond upon Thames

£828,443

£902,282

£73,839

£118

£44

Southwark

£562,806

£636,062

£73,256

£117

£44

Ealing

£521,379

£588,741

£67,362

£108

£40

Merton

£579,567

£646,126

£66,559

£107

£40

Hackney

£536,749

£602,463

£65,714

£105

£39

Barnet

£594,648

£653,516

£58,868

£94

£35

Hounslow

£490,275

£548,120

£57,845

£93

£34

Tower Hamlets

£490,371

£547,861

£57,490

£92

£34

Brent

£463,924

£521,305

£57,381

£92

£34

Haringey

£590,992

£648,139

£57,147

£92

£34

Harrow

£474,802

£530,680

£55,878

£90

£33

Hillingdon

£406,013

£459,174

£53,161

£85

£32

Hammersmith and Fulham

£987,006

£1,039,270

£52,264

£84

£31

Waltham Forest

£375,961

£424,289

£48,328

£77

£29

Kingston Upon Thames

£537,191

£585,075

£47,884

£77

£29

Enfield

£407,444

£453,970

£46,526

£75

£28

Greenwich

£392,683

£439,120

£46,437

£74

£28

Redbridge

£378,920

£421,365

£42,445

£68

£25

Newham

£313,537

£355,127

£41,590

£67

£25

Wandsworth

£750,989

£790,929

£39,940

£64

£24

Croydon

£361,861

£401,015

£39,154

£63

£23

Bromley

£450,291

£488,535

£38,244

£61

£23

Lewisham

£425,114

£461,219

£36,105

£58

£22

Havering

£315,640

£350,031

£34,391

£55

£21

Bexley

£303,887

£334,957

£31,070

£50

£19

Sutton

£389,243

£419,188

£29,945

£48

£18

Barking and Dagenham

£234,447

£261,587

£27,140

£43

£16

Average

£58,030

£93

£35

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Latest Comments

CommercialTrust
CommercialTrust 30 Jun 2016

This is great news for buyers and investors in a period of significant uncertainty. The 10-year buy-to-let fix at 3.99% in particular is excellent, a clear 100 bps ahead of the nearest competition. Though...

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Lee
Lee 30 Jun 2016

Let's see what happens to north-east property prices when Nissan announce they're leaving.

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DmitriKara
DmitriKara 29 Jun 2016

I just read another article about eviction rising and this was exactly what was on my mind, Housing has become "cat and mouse"...

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DmitriKara
DmitriKara 29 Jun 2016

I am really not surprised. I've seen one too many impudent tenants and in my humble opinion renters have one too many privileges and options to abuse heir landlord in so many ways...

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DmitriKara
DmitriKara 29 Jun 2016

There is still so much uncertainty and I will surely step back and see what's happening before I could make any decisions on my end.

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ChristinaReedUK
ChristinaReedUK 20 Jun 2016

I don't understand why it's always a war between the two sides. Either, way the landlord is probably keeping a detailed inventory and will see the changes you've made. I just don't understand why there...

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NathanGreen
NathanGreen 16 Jun 2016

Seeing that the tenants are quite satisfied with their landlords and the properties is indeed great. I wonder, though, what is the situation in London alone? The tenants face sky-high rent levels in the...

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AndiMur
AndiMur 15 Jun 2016

TheGuardian published the same forecast. But on the other hand, professional brokers express different opinions. According totranio.com, an exit from the EU would not affect the demand/supply imbalance...

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Gary Holmes
Gary Holmes 14 Jun 2016

Having a professionally completed inventory at check-in and check-out is clearly (to me at least) of minor value. Tenants make un-authorised modifications and/or walk off with items that belong to the

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Violet Gibson
Violet Gibson 14 Jun 2016

Cautious people think buying off-plan is reckless, but over the past few years investors have literally made fortunes.Pre-release prices have obvious benefits for the developer, who gets instant finance...

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Kate Windleton
Kate Windleton 14 Jun 2016

An interesting research indeed. I guess that is in complete contrast with the United States where people often move from one coast to another. It will be interesting to hear the trends for people moving...

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NathanGreen
NathanGreen 14 Jun 2016

I think it all depends on the market conditions and how well your company is doing. You will agree that you can't demand more when you're killing yourself just to hang in there. Sometimes you need all

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