How much did the average homeowner make per week in 2015?

How much did the average homeowner make per week in 2015?

The latest research by online estate agent, eMoov.co.uk, has highlighted how much UK homeowners made over the course of last year, through the increase in the value of their property.

On average homeowners across the UK made £27,264 in 2015, equating to £524 a week each for every full week and £16 for every working hour of the year. Around the same as the average salary in the UK.

London

With the inflated state of the property market in the capital, it’s almost a given that homeowners across the length and breadth of London have enjoyed some of the tidiest profits.  On average they bolstered their yearly income by £58,000 across the 32 boroughs, that’s £35 an hour, considerably higher than the minimum wage paid in the UK.

The London Borough of Camden saw the biggest rise, along with Westminster, with an increase of over £125,000 a year, £75 for every working hour, that’s an incredible £1.25 every working minute.

Homeowners in Islington, Kensington and Chelsea, Lambeth, Richmond and Southwark also enjoyed increases of over £70,000 for the year, between £40 and £55 for every working hour.

Barking and Dagenham saw the smallest increaseso across the capital at £27,000, however at a working rate of £16, homeowners in the borough have still picked up an additional income equivalent to the average UK salary.


Commuter Belt

The growing demand for affordable property in London’s commuter belt has seen property demand increase around the outskirts of the capital. Homeowners in the London commuter belt enjoyed an increase of £29,000 over the year, less than half that of the capital, but notable none the less. This still translates to just under £50 a week and £17 for every hour worked, a comforting figure to off-set those additional hours spent commuting each day.

Watford, Reading, Oxford, Brentwood and Aylesbury all ranked highest, as the most lucrative commuter zones for property value increase. Homeowners in these commuter spots made £60 a week thanks to the increasing value of their property, more than £20 an hour.

Outside of the South East

Outside of the London South East property bubble, the average increase drops, but homeowners still made £11,000 on average during 2015. At £7 for every working hour in the year, that’s still more than the minimum wage in the UK.

There were healthy increases for homeowners across the rest of the UK with Sefton, Solihull, Trafford, Southampton, Northampton, Bristol and Wiltshire all making between £10 and £16 an hour, whilst at work. That’s an additional £30 to £43 pocketed for every full week of 2015, simply through the increasing value of their property.

Unfortunately for homeowners in Durham, the city saw the smallest increase in property values, over the course of 2015. With an increase of just £607, it was the only location to see a return of less than £1, both weekly (97p), and for every hour its homeowners were at work (36p). Potential repercussions of the recent flooding in the area.

Founder and CEO of eMoov.co.uk, Russell Quirk, commented: “Homeownership is not only one of the biggest decisions in life but also one of, if not the most expensive asset us Brits will ever own. However getting over the hump of homeownership and the costs that come with it can certainly pay dividends in the long run, as this research shows.

London is always going to dominate in terms of property value increase, but even outside of the South East, UK homeowners across the board have enjoyed an increase in property value equivalent to a second salary.”

London

Location Name

Av House Price 2015

Av House Price 2016

Increase By Year

Increase By Full Week

Increase By Average Working Hour

Westminster

£1,258,255

£1,383,680

£125,425

£201

£75

Camden

£983,162

£1,108,489

£125,327

£201

£75

Islington

£719,152

£810,827

£91,675

£147

£55

Kensington and Chelsea

£2,106,135

£2,196,866

£90,731

£145

£54

Lambeth

£597,929

£675,758

£77,829

£125

£46

Richmond upon Thames

£828,443

£902,282

£73,839

£118

£44

Southwark

£562,806

£636,062

£73,256

£117

£44

Ealing

£521,379

£588,741

£67,362

£108

£40

Merton

£579,567

£646,126

£66,559

£107

£40

Hackney

£536,749

£602,463

£65,714

£105

£39

Barnet

£594,648

£653,516

£58,868

£94

£35

Hounslow

£490,275

£548,120

£57,845

£93

£34

Tower Hamlets

£490,371

£547,861

£57,490

£92

£34

Brent

£463,924

£521,305

£57,381

£92

£34

Haringey

£590,992

£648,139

£57,147

£92

£34

Harrow

£474,802

£530,680

£55,878

£90

£33

Hillingdon

£406,013

£459,174

£53,161

£85

£32

Hammersmith and Fulham

£987,006

£1,039,270

£52,264

£84

£31

Waltham Forest

£375,961

£424,289

£48,328

£77

£29

Kingston Upon Thames

£537,191

£585,075

£47,884

£77

£29

Enfield

£407,444

£453,970

£46,526

£75

£28

Greenwich

£392,683

£439,120

£46,437

£74

£28

Redbridge

£378,920

£421,365

£42,445

£68

£25

Newham

£313,537

£355,127

£41,590

£67

£25

Wandsworth

£750,989

£790,929

£39,940

£64

£24

Croydon

£361,861

£401,015

£39,154

£63

£23

Bromley

£450,291

£488,535

£38,244

£61

£23

Lewisham

£425,114

£461,219

£36,105

£58

£22

Havering

£315,640

£350,031

£34,391

£55

£21

Bexley

£303,887

£334,957

£31,070

£50

£19

Sutton

£389,243

£419,188

£29,945

£48

£18

Barking and Dagenham

£234,447

£261,587

£27,140

£43

£16

Average

£58,030

£93

£35

Join our mailing list:

Leave a comment



Latest Comments

Tony Gimple
Tony Gimple 09 Dec 2017

Linking professionalism to limited company borrowing is a flawed concept. Despite S24 etc., limited companies are the most tax inefficient way of running a property business and leave borrowers seriously...

view article
Evelyn Attwood
Evelyn Attwood 01 Dec 2017

It's normal. If you plan to buy a house in one of the most beautiful spots in the country you should pay a high price.

view article
Evelyn Attwood
Evelyn Attwood 01 Dec 2017

I think that the situation will be the same at December.

view article
Scott Garnet
Scott Garnet 06 Nov 2017

If you have a patio or a porch it is important to make sure that any connecting doors are secured. Good advice for sliding glass doors is replacing the panels with storm resistant glass and getting heavier...

view article
richardrawlings
richardrawlings 01 Nov 2017

What has not been mentioned here is the effect of not only higher interest payments, but also that these payments are less likely to be offsettable as a business cost due to the scaling back of mortgage...

view article
Kelvin Lloyd
Kelvin Lloyd 09 Oct 2017

IT is up, to the Planners. If they will only give permission for bungalows on certain (suitable) sites, they will be built.

view article
maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

It's just the beginning of the shocking rise.

view article
maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

I have recently read that the bungalows can provide social housing for elderly residents in London.

view article
zoe glover
zoe glover 05 Oct 2017

Update! Worst company I have ever dealt with. Undervalued a Cambridge property by over 100k, wont take on any evidence of valuation including a RICS valuation done 3 years ago for the very same value...

view article
Paul Edwards
Paul Edwards 27 Sep 2017

Its nonsense articles such as this that make it harder to get clients to realise just how difficult the market is out there. When you see Rightmove and there are more 'price reduced' then 'new' most days...

view article
Tom Allen
Tom Allen 20 Sep 2017

Absolutely agree with you!

view article
RyanGeo
RyanGeo 18 Sep 2017

A sharp correction would be a less dramatic expression to use. That is already underway in certain sectors in Reading where I practice as Chartered Surveyor

view article

Related stories

More articles from Property