Incorporating 'doesn't stack up' for majority of landlords

Incorporating 'doesn't stack up' for majority of landlords

The latest research from the National Landlords Association (NLA) has claimed that 40% of landlords are either seriously considering forming a limited company in order to limit their exposure to changes that will restrict mortgage interest – announced in last year’s Summer Budget – or will be looking into the option in the coming months.

However, the research found that so far only one per cent had actually incorporated, which the NLA says can be explained by the high cost of transferring property held personally into a company.

The findings also show that 31% have no intention of moving their portfolio to a limited company, and that 29% still unsure about whether they will incorporate or not.

Mortgage interest relief for individual residential landlords, which will be restricted to the basic rate of income tax (20%) by 2021, will begin to be phased back from April 2017.

The changes will mean that landlords will no longer be able to deduct the cost of mortgage interest before declaring their taxable profit, and will instead receive a tax credit of 20pc of their mortgage interest costs.

The NLA has labelled the changes the Turnover Tax, because landlords’ tax will be calculated on rental income they earn, rather than their profits, forcing many basic rate payers into a higher bracket and leaving higher and additional-rate payers with considerably bigger tax bills.


Landlords structured as companies will be exempt from the changes, instead paying corporation tax – currently 20 per cent – on their profits alone.

Richard Lambert, Chief Executive Officer at the NLA, said: “Transferring personally held property to a limited company isn’t a straightforward process, so it’s not surprising that so few have taken this action so far.

Landlords need to do their research but many will realise that incorporating simply doesn’t stack up financially; doing so will incur capital gains and potential stamp duty charges, which means the process may be prohibitively expensive”.

Richard Price, Executive Director of the UK Association of Letting Agents (UKALA), said: “While just one per cent have incorporated so far a significant proportion are still considering the move.If landlords follow through with these intentions then it’s likely that more and more will take a hands-on approach to managing their portfolios in the future, which would mean less business to go around for agents, and certainly less of a need for full service offerings.

The changes to taxation are forcing landlords to re-evaluate their businesses and their place in the market, so our advice for agents is to begin talking to your clients about their intentions over the next few years, and consider how you’ll meet their changing needs in a way that is distinct from your rivals’”.

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Spencer Fortag
Spencer Fortag 25 Aug 2016

The funny thing is, I mentioned the brick issue in my blog back in April: http://medwayproperty.blogspot.co.uk/2016/04/the-medway-property-market-and-lack-of.html

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SecomTech
SecomTech 19 Aug 2016

Firstly, I either lodge with DPS or do not take a deposit...secondly, If a tenant has not received a confirmation their deposit is secured with either a scheme or in an insured account with an agent/landlord,...

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jasonevans
jasonevans 19 Aug 2016

Belvoir has over 15 years of experience in property lettings, buying and renting and is one of the best agencies I know about. I have heard that they revived an award for the hard work. Really amazing...

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jasonevans
jasonevans 19 Aug 2016

Usually these areas are least affected when it comes to unexpected economical collapse.

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TheWaspNestRemover
TheWaspNestRemover 11 Aug 2016

You agree to pay for the treatment needed to get rid of fleas, ants, mice, wasps nests and other pests unless you can prove that these are a result of us not meeting our repairing responsibilities or these...

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madisonwelch80
madisonwelch80 02 Aug 2016

16% is quite a raise. Let's hope this tendency won't continue for long.

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madisonwelch80
madisonwelch80 02 Aug 2016

?66,963 is a serious price drop However buying a property it a serious investment only small percentage of the UK population could afford.

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madisonwelch80
madisonwelch80 02 Aug 2016

Wow, it kind of surprised me. I mean counting on mom and dad's bank even after retirement is too much. That's the moment in life when one should have ensured themselves. I am shocked.

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AbbieP.
AbbieP. 22 Jul 2016

"While house prices in the most expensive eleven boroughs have declined values in the cheapest eleven boroughs continue to rise" - not a nice way to even out the price range. London is overrated as it

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AbbieP.
AbbieP. 21 Jul 2016

And try to profit from your decisions, I may add

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CommercialTrust
CommercialTrust 19 Jul 2016

Retirement investment has always been one of the biggest draws of buy to let. And the buy-to-let demographic is, on balance, older. (Over a third of our applicants are over 50 at the time of application.) It...

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Forrest Wheatey
Forrest Wheatey 11 Jul 2016

I find the time perfect for ever home-owner wannabe. Prices should slowly, but steadily drop, at least for the inner buyer. Making it harder for outsiders to buy properties (the whole Brexit thing means...

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