Christmas home security tips

Christmas home security tips
It is easy to be distracted when you’re busy getting ready in the run up to Christmas, but taking just a few small steps can make a big difference

Co-op Insurance is urging people to be extra vigilant, as poor home security and cars laden with gifts can be easy pickings for opportunistic thieves this Christmas.

For peace of mind during the festive period Co-op Insurance automatically increases its customer’s contents cover by 10% in the weeks around Christmas and New Year to allow for the extra gifts and valuables in your home.

At this time of year your fridge or freezer might be full with festive treats, so check that your insurance policy covers you in case of any issues. Co-op Insurance’s policy covers policyholders should their fridge or freezer break, or there is a power failure, with any spoilt food covered up to a value of £1,000.

Co-op Insurance offers the following advice to keeping your home and belongings safe throughout the festive period:
 
1. Close your curtains when you have the lights on inside, in the dark winter months it is easy to tell when a house is unoccupied and burglars can use this to their advantage.

2. If you’re out for the night, leave a light on inside to look like the house is lived in.
 
3. Whilst Christmas shopping don’t let your handbag out of sight and make sure it is secure, as in busy crowds you can be an easy target for pick pockets.

4. Be sure to leave your presents out of sight and well hidden, away from a window, and if you’re out Christmas shopping in your car be sure to leave them out of view and locked in the boot


5. Be careful what you post on social media. As tempting as it is to show your friends what Santa’s bought you for Christmas, think carefully who will be able to read your posts, and make sure you check your privacy settings to see who can and who can’t read them

6. After the mania of present opening, discard your cardboard packaging in your bin outside or better still take to your local recycling centre, don’t leave on show outside for thieves to see what presents you’ve got.

7. Fairy lights can be a fire risk, consider buying new ones to ensure they have a good standard of safety, make sure you turn them off when unattended and don’t leave them on overnight

8. Check your insurance policy, presents kept in your home will be covered by your usual contents insurance, but if you've bought big ticket items as gifts they may need to be listed separately. Typically, the limit for single items ranges from £1,000 to £2,000, so check your policy and call your insurer if you've purchased anything above your limit.

9. Also check to see your insurance policy covers accidental damage cover, for any breakages to new items such as laptops, or wine spillages over the Christmas period.

Caroline Hunter, Head of Home Insurance at the Co-op, said: “Burglary is an extremely upsetting experience for anyone who happens to find themselves in this situation, however by taking simple security measures they can easily be prevented. It is easy to be distracted when you’re busy getting ready in the run up to Christmas, but taking just a few small steps can make a big difference, in keeping your home, your possessions and, most importantly, you safe.”

Whilst ensuring you are adequately covered over the festive season allows you to focus on the festivities instead of worrying that something may go wrong, so be sure to check that your policy provides a seasonal uplift.”
 
Lynn Farrar, Chair of Neighbourhood & Home Watch said: “At this time of year people are buying lots of new things and it’s important to remember that thieves and burglars know this and are looking for easy pickings to get their hands on the things you’ve bought.
 
Dark houses are a clear sign that no-one’s home and most burglaries are opportunistic. So our advice is to buy some timer switches for your lights and use them. It sounds simple but a few pounds spent on timers could save you much more this Christmas.”

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Latest Comments

Tony Gimple
Tony Gimple 09 Dec 2017

Linking professionalism to limited company borrowing is a flawed concept. Despite S24 etc., limited companies are the most tax inefficient way of running a property business and leave borrowers seriously...

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Evelyn Attwood
Evelyn Attwood 01 Dec 2017

It's normal. If you plan to buy a house in one of the most beautiful spots in the country you should pay a high price.

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Evelyn Attwood
Evelyn Attwood 01 Dec 2017

I think that the situation will be the same at December.

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Scott Garnet
Scott Garnet 06 Nov 2017

If you have a patio or a porch it is important to make sure that any connecting doors are secured. Good advice for sliding glass doors is replacing the panels with storm resistant glass and getting heavier...

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richardrawlings
richardrawlings 01 Nov 2017

What has not been mentioned here is the effect of not only higher interest payments, but also that these payments are less likely to be offsettable as a business cost due to the scaling back of mortgage...

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Kelvin Lloyd
Kelvin Lloyd 09 Oct 2017

IT is up, to the Planners. If they will only give permission for bungalows on certain (suitable) sites, they will be built.

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maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

It's just the beginning of the shocking rise.

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maggie swift
maggie swift 09 Oct 2017

I have recently read that the bungalows can provide social housing for elderly residents in London.

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zoe glover
zoe glover 05 Oct 2017

Update! Worst company I have ever dealt with. Undervalued a Cambridge property by over 100k, wont take on any evidence of valuation including a RICS valuation done 3 years ago for the very same value...

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Paul Edwards
Paul Edwards 27 Sep 2017

Its nonsense articles such as this that make it harder to get clients to realise just how difficult the market is out there. When you see Rightmove and there are more 'price reduced' then 'new' most days...

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Tom Allen
Tom Allen 20 Sep 2017

Absolutely agree with you!

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RyanGeo
RyanGeo 18 Sep 2017

A sharp correction would be a less dramatic expression to use. That is already underway in certain sectors in Reading where I practice as Chartered Surveyor

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