Is Buy to Let still an attractive investment?

Is Buy to Let still an attractive investment?

Following an analysis of the market, Private Finance believes that although buy to let remains an attractive investment in the immediate future, it also warned that accessing finance will now be the biggest challenge for amateur landlords in the new market landscape.

Private Finance’s analysis takes several key factors into account including the reduction in higher rate tax relief, the stamp duty increase and the outlook for house prices and yields. The broker has also considered the impact of the European Mortgage Credit Derivative (MCD) and concluded that whilst these factors may have a negative impact, they are unlikely to dampen the market altogether.  

Private Finance has applied its model to a typical buy to let situation in a typical commuter town. Its findings demonstrate that a potential 62% return on capital could be achievable, if the investment is held for a term of at least five years utilising a fixed rate mortgage at 3.6% for the duration which is currently available in today’s market.

Whilst a number of commentators have suggested that annual capital appreciation of as much as 5% is achievable in areas such as this, Simon Checkley, Managing Director of Private Finance has said that a buy to let still remains viable at a lower rate of appreciation.


Checkley says:"Of course, these figures assume the full extent of the tax relief reduction and stamp duty hike so the short term returns could look more attractive if you are able to take immediate action and complete a purchase before 1 April 2016 when the increased stamp duty will apply.

We are not underestimating the impact of the loss of higher rate tax relief or the increase in stamp duty on the market. What we are saying is that they are not necessarily 'deal breakers'. Of course, there have been many protestations in recent weeks from concerned landlords as a result of the planned tax changes. What is less commonly recognised is that there are still opportunities in this market if an investor makes a sound purchase subject to other underlying economic factors.

Understandably, many landlords are claiming they will lose considerable sums of money as a result of these changes. However this does beg the question of the true viability of their original investment.’

Checkley added: "With regards to house prices versus yields, it can be difficult to make things work in London because house prices are such that yields remain relatively low. This obviously affects the amount of mortgage you can obtain and therefore the attractiveness of buy to let as a whole. However, a number of commuter towns by contrast are offering both the potential for capital growth as well as decent yields."

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Latest Comments

Paul
Paul 25 May 2016

Estate agents are pathetic when it comes to fees. They have this 'I had to do it at 1% because that's what the others were quoting' mentality. We are the most expensive agents in our area, charging double...

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HMO Midlands Landlady 24 May 2016

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CommercialTrust
CommercialTrust 20 May 2016

With the bulk of the market controlled by large developers, profit rather than necessity determine the pace at which homes are built. There are hundreds of thousands of plots that have planning permission...

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Johna
Johna 20 May 2016

"Easier said than done" is what I would say. Of course, it would be more than great to have more in quality and affordability, but I do not trust talk anymore.. What is said is not what is happening.

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Johna
Johna 20 May 2016

in my humble opinion being fair like THE most important! I myself have had bad experience with unfair landlords... not to mention that I know how to do a proper end of tenancy cleaning since I am a fantastic...

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richardrawlings
richardrawlings 18 May 2016

NB - even if we doubled our commission levels in the UK, we'd still be by far the cheapest agents in the entire world.

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Agent_PeeBee
Agent_PeeBee 18 May 2016

Clueless. Someone needs to take these people's computers away from them so they can do no more harm than they already have.

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richardrawlings
richardrawlings 18 May 2016

Nonsense! The cost of selling a house nowadays has little bearing on the fees charged. Don't believe your own spin on this. Fees have spiralled down to pathetic levels in areas where weak agents have allowed...

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Simon Oliver
Simon Oliver 16 May 2016

The best solution is to buy a property that has built-in income generating potential: a nice house with a couple of gites in the grounds is a good start. In France, the rune of thumb is that one 2-bedroomed...

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WPD
WPD 12 May 2016

I suggest the answer is to have the notary system being one legal person who represents both parties. Having experienced it a couple of times in France it was a dream compared to our dysfunctional system....

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warren
warren 03 May 2016

It's enough to make me weep into my Pimm's :(

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james anderson 03 May 2016

The sad demise of the croquet lawn...

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